McGeorge professors address the critical issues of our times in scholarship that seeks to advance society. Here are recent examples.

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Statutory Interpretation

In recent articles, Distinguished Professor Brian Slocum, working with other leading scholars, tests the accuracy of long-standing principles of legal interpretation through empirical studies and linguistic theory. The Michigan Law Review recently published his article The Meaning of Sex: Dynamic Words, Novel Applications, and Original Public Meaning, while the Columbia Law Review recently published his article Statutory Interpretation from the Outside. His article Progressive Textualism is in press with the Georgetown Law Journal while his article Ordinary Meaning and Ordinary People is in press with the University of Pennsylvania Law Review.

Policing and Criminal Justice

Assistant Professor Nadia Banteka seeks to advance police accountability in her articles Police Ignorance and (Un)reasonable Fourth Amendment Exclusion published in the Vanderbilt Law Review and Police Brutality as Torture forthcoming in the UCLA Law Review.

In The Victims’ Rights Movement: What It Gets Right and What It Gets Wrong, in press with New York University Press, Distinguished Professor Michael Vitello flags the limitations of the victims' rights movement.

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Zoning

Professor John Sprankling’s article The Constitutional Right to “Establish a Home,” recently published in the George Washington Law Review, provides a new method to challenge exclusionary zoning.

Cybersecurity

Professor Michael Mireles looks at a rapidly evolving and increasingly critical field in his recently published treatise, Cybersecurity Law published by West Academic.

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Industry Regulation

Professor Daniel Croxall looks at the Constitution and state regulation of business in his articles Arming Goliath: Independent Craft Beer Is in Jeopardy at the Intersection of a First Amendment Circuit Split, the Twenty-First Amendment, and the Erosion of Tied-House Laws recently published in the Florida State Law Review and Delirium of Disorder: Tension Between the Dormant Commerce Clause and the Twenty-First Amendment Stunts Independent Craft Brewery Growth just published in the Penn State Law Review.

Preserving Democracy

In her U.S. national report on Fake News, just published in the American Journal of Comparative Law, Professor Leslie Gielow Jacobs addresses the tension of combating misinformation while preserving free speech.

Distinguished Professor Franklin Gevurtz provides a nuanced exploration of the threat that powerful corporations pose to democracy in his article The Complex Dualisms of Corporations and Democracy just published in the Northeastern University Law Review.

Distinguished Professor Michael Vitello's article, Trump’s Legacy: The Long-term Risks to American Democracy, was recently published in the Lewis and Clark Law Review.

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Books Published by Faculty, 2016 - 2020

Adrienne L. Brungess

  • Intercultural Competence, in Global Lawyering Skills 23 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Maureen Watkins).
  • Rules: An Overview of Statutory Interpretation and Synthesis, in Global Lawyering Skills 45 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed., 2018).
  • Receiving and Implementing Feedback, in Global Lawyering Skills 119 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Stephanie J. Thompson).
  • Persuasive Legal Writing, in Global Lawyering Skills 161 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Mary-Beth Moylan).
  • Negotiation and Settlement, in Global Lawyering Skills 281 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).

Ederlina Y. Co

  • Maher v. Roe, 432 U.S. 464 (1977), in Feminist Judgments: Reproductive Justice  Rewritten (Rachel Rebouche, ed., Cambridge 2020).
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution, in Global Lawyering Skills 263 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Mary-Beth Moylan & Stephanie J. Thompson).

Daniel J. Croxall

  • Professionalism and Professional Identity, in Global Lawyering Skills 35 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Lindsey D. Blanchard and Jeffrey E. Proske).

Omar M. Dajani

  • Divorce Without Separation: Reimagining the Two-State Solution, 15 Ethnopolitics 366 (2016).

Gretchen Franz 

  • The Formal Memorandum, in Global Lawyering Skills 95 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018). 
  • Pre-Trial Motions, in Global Lawyering Skills 177 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).

Franklin A. Gevurtz

  • United States: The Protection of Minority Investors and Compensation of Their Losses, in Global Securities Litigation and Enforcement at 109 (Pierre-Henri Conac and Martin Gelter, eds., Cambridge 2019).
  • Mergers and Acquisitions Law (West Academic 2018) (with Christina M. Sautter).
  • Globalizing Up Corporate Law, in Innovations in Corporate Governance: Global Perspectives 25 (Susan Watson & P.M. Vasudev eds., Edward Elgar 2017).

Jennifer Harder

  • Cases & Materials on Water Law (West 10th ed. 2020) (with Gregory Weber and Bennet Bearden).

J. Clark Kelso

  • Three Sacramento Justices - Champions of Liberty, 29 WESTERN LEGAL HIST. 85 (2018).

Lawrence C. Levine

  • Tort Law and Practice (6th ed. 2020) (with Dominick Vetri, Joan E. Vogel, Ibrahim J. Gassama & Carol M. Suzuki).
  • Understanding Torts (6th ed. 2018) (with John L. Diamond & Anita Bernstein).
  • Tort Law and Practice (5th ed. 2016) (with Dominick Vetri, Joan E. Vogel & Ibrahim J. Gassama).

Michael P. Malloy

  • Interdisciplinarity: Classic Crossover Cases and Effective Law Pedagogy, in Challenges of the Law in a Permeable World 11 (David A. Frenkel, ed., Athens Inst. for Educ. & Res. 2019).
  • Banking and Financial Institutions Law in a Nutshell (West Academic, 9th ed., 2019) (with William A. Lovett).
  • International Banking: Cases, Materials, and Problems, 4th ed. (Carolina Academic Press: 2019).
  • Encountering UTOPIA: Social Stresses and Responsibilities of the Lawyer, in Role of Law, Human Rights and Social Justice, Justice Systems, Commerce, and Law Curriculum: Selected Issues 13 (David A. Frenkel, ed., Athens Inst. for Educ. & Res. 2017).
  • Contracts in a Nutshell (West Academic, 8th ed., 2017) (with Claude D. Rohwer and Anthony M. Skrocki).
  • Contemporary Payment Systems (West Academic 2016).
  • Risk Management in Financial Services, in Business, Economics and Mercantile Law: Selected Issues 11 (David A. Frenkel and Anna Chronopoulou, eds., Athens Inst. for Educ. & Res. 2016).

Stephen C. McCaffrey

  • Introduction: The Path to the UN Watercourses Convention and Beyond, in The UN Convention on the Law of the Non-Navigational Uses of International Watercourses (Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, Makane Moise Mbengue, Mara Tignino and Komlan Sangbana, eds., Oxford University Press 2019).
  • The Law of International Watercourses (3rd ed., Oxford University Press 2019).
  • Intertwined General Principles, in Research Handbook on International Water Law at 83 (Stephen C. McCaffrey, Christina Leb and Riley T. Denoon, eds., Edward Elgar 2019).
  • The Customary Law of International Watercourses, in Research Handbook on Freshwater Law and International Relations at 147, (Mara Tignino, Christian Brethaut and Laura Turley eds., Edward Elgar 2018).
  • Learning Conflict of Laws (West Academic 2018) (with Thomas O. Main).
  • Environmental Law and Freshwater Ecosystems, in Nicaragua before the International Court of Justice: Impacts on International Law 347 (Edgardo Sobenes Obregon & Benjamin Samson, eds., Springer 2018).
  • Promoting Equity, Cooperation and Innovation in the Fields of Transboundary Waters and Natural Resources Management: The Legacy of Dr. David J.H. Phillips, (with John S. Murray & Melvin Woodhouse, co-eds., Brill Nijhoff 2017).
  • The Evolution of International Law Relating to Transboundary Waters, in Routledge Handbook of Water Law and Policy, at 205 (Alistair Rieu-Clarke, Andrew Allan & Sarah Hendry, eds., 2017).
  • International Law for the Environment (West 2016) (with Edith Brown Weiss, et al.).

Francis J. Mootz, III

  • Party Like It’s 1989: Justice Scalia’s Rhetoric of Certainty, in Justice Scalia: Rhetoric and the Rule of Law 97 (Francis J. Mootz III & Brian G. Slocum, eds., University of Chicago Press 2019).
  • Learning Employment Law (West Academic 2019) (with Leticia M. Saucedo & Michael P. Maslanka).
  • Ethical Cannabis Lawyering in California, 9 St. Mary's J. Legal Malpractice & Ethics 2 (2018).
  • Vico, Llewellyn and the Task of Legal Education, in The Doctrine-Skills Divide: Legal Education's Self-Inflicted Wound (Linda H. Edwards, Carolina Academic Press, 2017).
  • Getting Over the Originalist Fixation, in The Nature of Legal Interpretation: What Jurists Can Learn About Legal Interpretation From Linguistics and Philosophy 156 (Brian G. Slocum, ed.; University of Chicago Press, 2017).

Mary-Beth Moylan

  • Kulko v. Superior Court, 436 U.S. 84 (1978), in Feminist Judgments: Family Law Opinions Rewritten (Rachel Rebouche, ed., Cambridge 2020) (with Katherine Macfarlane).
  • Introduction, in Global Lawyering Skills 1 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • The Process of Legal Writing, in Global Lawyering Skills 69 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Persuasive Legal Writing, in Global Lawyering Skills 161 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Adrienne L. Brungess).
  • The Appellate Brief, in Global Lawyering Skills 213 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Oral Argument, in Global Lawyering Skills 225 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution, in Global Lawyering Skills 263 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Ederlina Co & Stephanie J. Thompson).

Blake Nordahl

  • A Migration Story from the Sugar Fields of Southwest Guatemala: A Case for Treating Corporations as Persecutors under Asylum and Refugee Law, in From Extraction to Emancipation: Development Reimagined 237 (Raquel Aldana & Steven W. Bender, eds., Carolina Academic Press 2018).

Jeffrey E. Proske

  • Professionalism and Professional Identity, in Global Lawyering Skills 35 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Lindsey D. Blanchard and Daniel J. Croxall).
  • Professional Correspondence, in Global Lawyering Skills 151 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Contract Drafting, in Global Lawyering Skills 295 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).

Rachael E. Salcido

  • Rethinking Environmental Impact Assessment in Guatemalan Mining, in From Extraction To Emancipation: Development Reimagined 71 (Raquel Aldana & Steven W. Bender, eds., Carolina Academic Press 2018).
  • The Law of Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances in a Nutshell (West Academic, 3d ed. 2018) (with John Sprankling).

Michael Hunter Schwartz

  • Contracts: A Context and Practice Casebook (Carolina Academic Press, 3rd ed. 2020) (with Adrian J. Walters).
  • Expert Learning for Law Students (Carolina Academic Press, 3rd ed., 2018) (with Paula J. Manning).
  • Teaching Law by Design for Adjuncts (Carolina Academic Press, 2nd ed., 2017) (with Sophie M. Sparrow and Gerald F. Hess).
  • Teaching Law by Design: Engaging Students from the Syllabus to the Final Exam (Carolina Academic Press, 2nd ed., 2017) (with Sophie M. Sparrow and Gerald F. Hess).

Brian G. Slocum

  • No Vehicles on Mars, in Justice Scalia: Rhetoric and the Rule of Law 49 (Francis J. Mootz III & Brian G. Slocum, eds., University of Chicago Press 2019) (with Francis J. Mootz III).
  • Pragmatics and Legal Texts: How Best to Account for the Gaps between Literal Meaning and Communicative Meaning, in The Pragmatic Turn in Law: Inference and Interpretation in Legal Discourse 119 (Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein, eds., Walter de Gruyter Inc., 2017).
  • The Contribution of Linguistics to Legal Interpretation, in The Nature of Legal Interpretation: What Jurists Can Learn About Legal Interpretation From Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (Brian G. Slocum, ed.; University of Chicago Press, 2017).
     

John G. Sprankling

  • Understanding Trade Secret Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2020) (with Thomas G. Sprankling).
  • Property: A Contemporary Approach (West, 4th ed., 2018) (with Raymond Coletta).
  • The Law of Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances in a Nutshell (West Academic, 3d ed. 2018) (with Rachael Salcido).
  • Understanding Property Law (Carolina Academic Press, 4th ed., 2017).

Edward Telfeyan

  • The Last Critical Task: The “White-Glove Inspection, in Global Lawyering Skills 369 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).

Stephanie J. Thompson

  • Legal Reasoning and Analysis Toolkit, in Global Lawyering Skills 57 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Knowing Your Audience, in Global Lawyering Skills 77 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Objective Legal Writing, in Global Lawyering Skills 87 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Receiving and Implementing Feedback, in Global Lawyering Skills 119 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Adrienne Brungess).
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution, in Global Lawyering Skills 263 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018) (with Ederlina Co & Mary-Beth Moylan).
  • The Citation Requirement, in Global Lawyering Skills 361 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).

Michael Vitiello

  • Cases and Materials on Marijuana Law (West Academic 2019) (with Howard Bromberg and Mark K. Osbeck).
  • Persuasive Written and Oral Advocacy in Trial and Appellate Courts (4th ed., Wolters Kluwer 2018) (with Michael R. Fontham).
  • Animating Civil Procedure (Carolina Academic Press 2017).

Linda E. Carter (emeritus July 2016)

  • Introduction, in Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: The Detrimental Effect of International Tribunals, at 1 (Jennifer Schense, co-ed., International Nuremberg Principles Academy 2016) (with Jennifer Schense).
  • Conclusion: Findings and Recommendations, in Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: The Detrimental Effect of International Tribunals, at 333 (Jennifer Schense, co-ed., International Nuremberg Principles Academy 2016) (with Jennifer Schense).

Julie A. Davies (emeritus May 2019)

  • The Impact of Mining on Self-Determination of Rural Guatemalan Communities, in From Extraction to Emancipation: Development Reimagined 153 (Raquel Aldana & Steven W. Bender, eds., Carolina Academic Press 2018).

Thomas J. Leach (emeritus Dec. 2020)

  • Federal and California Evidence Rules (2016-17 ed., Wolters Kluwer 2016) (with Emily Garcia Uhrig).

Hether C. Macfarlane (emeritus May 2018)

  • The Short-Form Memorandum, in Global Lawyering Skills 109 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • Domestic and Foreign Legal Systems, in Global Lawyering Skills 7 (Mary-Beth Moylan, Stephanie Thompson, et al., West, 2nd ed. 2018).
  • California Legal Research (3rd ed. 2016) (with Aimee Dudovitz and Suzanne E. Rowe).

Other Prior Scholarship

Fall 2021

Distinguished Professor of Law Brian Slocum

“Statutory Interpretation from the Outside,” is in press with the Columbia Law Review (with Kevin Tobia and Victoria Nourse). The article offers a novel framework for empirically testing interpretive canons based on how ordinary people evaluate rules.

His article, “The Meaning of Sex: Dynamic Words, Novel Applications, and Original Public Meaning,” in press with the Michigan Law Review, (with William Eskridge and Stefan Th. Gries), offers a new framework for how long-standing civil rights statutes should be interpreted over time to recognize societal and linguistic evolution.

 

Associate Professor Ederlina Co

“Abortion Privilege,” is in press with the Rutgers Law Review. The article launches a critical dialogue about the abortion privilege to shore up the constitutional right to an abortion.

Co will be among the nation’s leading abortion rights scholars speaking at a symposium on “Abortion Rights at a Crossroads” in February 2022 at the University of Pittsburgh Law School. Co was also a contributing author to “Feminist Judgments: Reproductive Justice Rewritten,” which was published by Cambridge Press in 2020.

 

Professors Jarrod Wong and Brian Slocum

“The Vienna Convention and the Ordinary Meaning of International Law, is in press with the Yale Journal of International Law. The article critiques the fundamentally flawed approach to interpreting language in international treaties, including the failure of the Vienna Convention of the Law of Treaties to address fundamental interpretive issues such as indeterminate ordinary meaning and multiple language communities.

 

Associate Professor Nadia Banteka

“Police Ignorance and (Un)reasonable FourthAmendment Exclusion,” is in press with the Vanderbilt Law Review. The article offers a new approach to the “good faith” exception to the exclusionary rule.

Banteka joined the McGeorge School of Law faculty in August. Banteka’s scholarship has appeared in legal publications, including the Virginia Journal of International Law, Columbia Journal of Transnational Law; Cornell International Law Journal; Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law; Michigan Journal of International Law; Houston Law Review; and Seton Hall Law Review.

 

Professor John Sprankling

“The Constitutional Right to “Establish a Home,” is in press with the George Washington Law Review, explores a new method to challenge exclusionary zoning ordinances that in many cities prevent people of color from securing affordable homes.

 

Anthony M. Kennedy Chair Leslie Gielow Jacobs

“Fake News,” is in press with the American Journal of Comparative Law, sets out the existing legal structure in the United States to address the problem of disinformation, recent developments, and proposals for change within the confines of the Constitution.

Jacobs’ book review, “Noticing the Government’s Voice and Pondering Its Implications” (reviewing The Government’s Speech and the Constitution by Helen Norton) has been published in Constitutional Commentary.

 

Associate Professor Daniel Croxall

“Arming Goliath: Independent Craft Breweries are in Jeopardy at the Intersection of a First Amendment Circuit Split, the Twenty-First Amendment, and the Erosion of Tied-House Laws,” is in press with the Florida State Law ReviewIt addresses the negative consequences of finding that state bans on breweries paying retailers for advertising space violate the First Amendment.

His article, “Delirium of Disorder: Tension Between the Dormant Commerce Clause and the Twenty-First Amendment Stunts Craft Brewery Growth” is in press with Penn State Law Review. It examines a long-standing tension between the dormant Commerce Clause and the Twenty-First Amendment.

 

Assistant Clinical Professor Ron Hochbaum

Bathrooms as a Homeless Rights Issue,” was published in the North Carolina Law Review. Hochbaum’s article is the first to examine the right to access bathrooms as it relates to the community of people experiencing homelessness and the paradox where cities, counties, and states provide few public bathrooms for this community while criminalizing public urination and defecation.

Hochbaum joined the McGeorge School of Law faculty in July. He is the director of the school’s Homeless Advocacy Clinic. His scholarship has previously appeared in the Villanova Sports and Entertainment Law Journal.

 

Spring 2022

Distinguished Professor of Law Brian Slocum

Distinguished Professor Brian Slocum's article Ordinary Meaning and Ordinary People (with Kevin Tobia and Victoria Nourse) has been accepted for publication in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. This article argues that the long-standing presumption that terms in legal texts should be given their “ordinary” (common or everyday) meanings may be inaccurate based on five original empirical studies which reveal that ordinary people regularly understand terms in law to communicate technical legal, rather than ordinary, meanings. This article builds upon Professor Slocum’s article Statutory Interpretation from the Outside (with Tobia and Nourse) just published in the Columbia Law Review, which offers a novel framework for empirically testing interpretive canons based on how ordinary people evaluate rules.

 

Associate Professor Nadia Banteka

Assistant Professor Nadia Banteka’s article Police Brutality as Torture has been accepted for publication in the UCLA Law Review. This article proposes a new way of increasing accountability for police brutality through a model criminal statute specifically classifying such conduct as torture. The Vanderbilt Law Review recently published Professor Banteka's article Police Ignorance and (Un)reasonable Fourth Amendment Exclusion, which also addresses police misconduct and offers a new approach to the “good faith” exception to the exclusionary rule.

 

Professor Jarrod Wong

Professor Jarrod Wong's article The Legislative Stabilization Clause (with McGeorge JSD student Abdallah Abuelfutuh Ali) has been accepted for publication in the NYU Journal of International Law and Politics. This article reconceptualizes stabilization clauses in national legislation by offering a new taxonomy and argues that Contractual Legislative Stabilization Clauses are best positioned to restore equilibrium in the relationship between host states and foreign investors.

 

Professor Michael Vitello

Professor Michael Vitello has entered a contract with New York University Press to publish his book The Victims’ Rights Movement: What It Got Right and What It Gets Wrong, which takes a critical look at the Victims’ Right Movement and argues that it has resulted in excessive punishment and false promises to crime victims.

 

Professor Omar Dajani

In Federalism and Decentralization in the Contemporary Middle East and North Africa, edited and including introductory and concluding chapters by Professors Omar Dajani and Aslı Bâli (UCLA) – to be published this summer by Cambridge University Press – Professor Dajani and other leading experts explore whether decentralizing government institutions can help manage and resolve identity conflict and offer meaningful self-determination to peoples in a region beset by religious and ethnic persecution and strife.

 

Professor Emeritus Brian Landsberg

In his recently published book, Revolution by Law: The Federal Government and the Desegregation of Alabama Schools (University of Kansas Press), Professor Emeritus Brian Landsberg recounts how the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice radically transformed the Deep South's political, social and economic racial caste system.

Professor Brian Slocum

In The Meaning of Sex: Dynamic Words, Novel Applications, and Original Public Meaning, forthcoming in the Michigan Law Review, Professor Slocum and his co-authors, William Eskridge of Yale and noted linguist Stefan Th. Gries of UCSB, use linguistic theory and corpus analysis to offer a new framework for how long-standing civil rights statutes should be interpreted over time to recognize societal and linguistic evolution. This article follows from an amicus brief submitted by Professor Slocum and two other professors in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, which used historical corpus linguistics to argue that the term 'sex' in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should be interpreted to protect lesbians, gay men, transgender persons and other sex and gender minorities against workplace discrimination.

In other recent work demonstrating his status as one of the nation's leading scholars on corpus linguistics and statutory interpretation, Profssor Slocum's article, Reforming the Canon of Constitutional Avoidance, is in press with the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, while his essay, Judging Corpus Linguistics(with Professor Gries), was published by the Southern California Law Review Postscript.

 

Professor Rachael Salcido

While recent events have highlighted police misconduct and communities of color, Professor Salcido addresses how polluting activities disproportionately impact communities of color. In her paper, Weaponizing Environmental Justice, presented at the National People of Color 4th Annual Conference and now in press with the UCLA Journal of Environmental Law & Policy, Salcido examines efforts to achieve environmental justice and argues weaponizing this concept requires leaning into it as a moment rather than a concise legal framework and focusing on tools and strategies that can re-orient power to combat environmental injustice.

 

Anthony M. Kennedy Chair Leslie Gielow Jacobs

Professor Jacobs argues for a greater ability of government entities to limit the messages, including hate speech, of private speakers invited onto government property in "Incitement Lite" for the Nonpublic Forum, published this year in the Brooklyn Law Review. This article is the latest in Professor Jacobs' extensive examination of issues involving free speech.

 

Professors Mary-Beth Moylan and Ederlina Co

Professors Moylan and Co are contributors to the U.S. Feminist Judgments Project in which leading feminist legal scholars rewrite, with feminist reasoning, United States Supreme Court opinions involving sex and gender. In this work, published by Cambridge University Press, each rewritten decision is preceded by a substantive commentary that discusses the Supreme Court opinion and reflects on how the rewritten decision amplifies understanding of the case and highlights potential differences that might have resulted in development of the specific law. Professor Moylan addresses Kulko v. Superior Court for the Family Law volume, while Professor Co address Maher v. Roe for the Reproductive Justice volume.

 

Professor Omar Dajani

In 2021, Cambridge University Press will publish Federalism and Decentralization in the Contemporary Middle East and North Africa, a new volume edited and including introductory and concluding chapters by Professor Dajani and UCLA Law Professor Aslı Bâli. The book explores whether decentralizing government institutions can help manage and resolve identity conflict within the states of the region and offer meaningful self-determination to peoples beset by religious and ethnic persecution and strife, including, in the chapter co-written by Professor Dajani, in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and in the fractured states of Yemen, Libya, and Syria.

 

Professor Michael Vitiello

In Marijuana Legalization, Racial Disparity and the Hope for Reform, published last year in the Lewis and Clark Law Review, Professor Vitiello explores the racist origins of marijuana laws and whether modern reform can address racial disparity in the "legal" marijuana market. Professor Vitiello addresses the excessive incarceration resulting from drug charges in The War on drugs: Moral Panic and Excessive Sentences forthcoming in the Cleveland State Law Review; while in The End of the War on Drugs, the Peace Dividend and the Renewed Fourth Amendment?, forthcoming in the Oklahoma Law Review, and Arnold Loewy, Ernesto Miranda, Earl Warren, and Donald Trump: Confessions and the Fifth Amendment, recently published in the Texas Tech Law Review, Professor Vitiello addresses the loss and potential renewal of protections against unconstitutional police conduct.

 

Emeritus Professor Brian Landsberg

In his forthcoming book, Revolution by Law: The Federal Government and the Desegregation of Alabama Schools, Emeritus Professor Brian Landsberg recounts how the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice radically transformed the Deep South's political, social and economic racial caste system. It focuses on Lee v. Macon County Board of Education, which culminated in a federal court ordering desegregation of public schools in Alabama. Lee became the model for litigation that transformed the schools of the Deep South from the most to the least segregated in the nation.

 

Professor Stephen McCaffrey

Recognizing a career that includes authoring the seminal article advocating a human right to water—a matter of critical importance to impoverished communities throughout the world—the ABA Section of International Law this year conferred the Louis B. Sohn Award for Public International Law on Professor McCaffrey. This is the latest in a number of awards garnered by Professor McCaffrey over the last several years, including being named the 2017 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate (considered comparable to a Nobel Prize in water), awarded by the King of Sweden.

Professor Franklin Gevurtz

In his article, The Shareholder Approval Conundrum, published last year in the Boston College Law Review, Professor Gevurtz explains why shareholders almost invariably approve mergers despite studies showing that managers negotiating such mergers often sell out the shareholders' interest in getting the best deal in favor of mergers in which managers retain their positions or get compensation and addresses the implications of this insight on judicial review of such mergers.

 

Professor Christine Manolakas

Prompted by the annual increase in the number and severity of natural disasters that is now the new normal, Professor Manolakas' article, The Tax Law and Policy of Natural Disasters, published last year in the Baylor Law Review, looks at the tax laws applicable to the possible gains and the inevitable losses impacting individuals, families, businesses and communities from natural disasters and addresses how to minimize further economic cost from the application of complex and often unfair laws of federal taxation.

 

Professor Michael Malloy

As a leading expert in domestic and international banking, Professor Malloy served as one of the principal contributors to the Policy Framework for Sustainable Real Estate Markets published by the UN Economic Commission for Europe last year. The new Policy Framework reflects the impact of key international agreements that led to the emergence of new, more integrated approaches to sustainable urban development at all levels. In his article, The Emerging International Regime of Financial Services Regulation, forthcoming in the North Carolina Journal of International Law, Professor Malloy argues that the Swiss-based Bank for International Settlements is transforming international bank regulation in ways that fundamentally affect even national banking. Finally, the fourth edition of Professor Malloy's International Banking: Cases, Materials, and Problems was just published.

 

Professor Daniel Croxall

Professor Croxall examines unfair practices by the major global beer producers directed against craft beer breweries in his articles, How Federal Ambivalence Regarding Below-Cost Pricing Turns a Blind-eye to Monopoly Risk in the Beer Market, forthcoming in the Loyola Los Angeles Law ReviewIndependent Craft Breweries Struggle Under Distribution Laws That Create a Power Imbalance in Favor of Wholesalers, forthcoming in the William & Mary Business Law ReviewHelping Craft Beer Maintain and Grow Market Shares with Private Enforcement of Tied-House and False Advertising Law published last year in the Gonzaga Law Review.

 

Professor Michael Mireles

Professor Mireles continues his empirical exploration of the enforcement of patents by U.S. universities and other nonprofit organizations. In the first of his two recent book chapters, published by Edward Elgar in its Research Handbook series, Professor Mireles and his co-author look at patent litigation by U.S. universities and other nonprofits, while the second recent book chapter by Professor Mireles and the same co-author, in an edited work published by Routledge, examines patenting behavior by U.S. universities and other nonprofits in developed countries.

 

Professor John Sprankling

Internationally known for his expertise in property law—including having developed the field of international property law—Professor Sprankling has turned his attention to intellectual property. His treatise, Understanding Trade Secret Law (with Thomas G. Sprankling) was just published.